Meet the NPR Listener

Every day millions of people across America tune in to NPR stations coast-to-coast. They say they want to stay connected, feel informed and be part of a greater community. They say they are active listeners, habitual and loyal. And they rely on NPR to inform them and enhance their lives.

It’s a relationship based on trust. During the current coronavirus crisis, 77% of radio listeners say they trust NPR to provide answers and solutions — more than say the same for the CDC, newspapers, TV, or government.

Here is a collection of their stories.

Article
May 2020

A WBEZ listener who shares stories with his community

“My boss is like, how many times are you going to start a story with ‘I heard this on NPR!?’ jokes Matthew Rillie, an NPR listener in Chicago. “It’s a running joke and it’s never no less than three times a day.”

Article
May 2020

An active listening practice in San Francisco

“When I’m listening to KQED, I’ll stop and take a note,” says Haley Sage, an NPR listener in California. “There’s always paper and pen around. Little notes will end up everywhere!” 

Article
May 2020

A WNYC listener with a radio in every room

“What I admire in these programs is their audacity and their willingness to take risks,” remarks all-day listener Patricia in New Jersey. “I recognize the amount of work that goes into each and every one of these programs.”

Article
May 2020

A Brooklyn couple cooks and listens together

“Because we’re listening to the same thing, it gives us something to reflect on together,” says Allegra Oxborough, an NPR listener in Brooklyn. “We’re listening to the radio a lot together now. Things are slower, and you can actually be present with your activities.”

Article
May 2020

How a WBEZ listener wins at trivia

“I’m always saying to my friends, ‘I heard it on NPR,’ says William Lee, an NPR listener in Chicago. “My friends know. They laugh, but you know, I win at trivia night.”

Article
May 2020

How a WNYC listener stays connected to home

“Something nice about live radio is that there’s an authoritativeness to it,” reflects Zach, a 24 year-old NPR listener in Massachusetts. “Since only one story can be told at a time, it feels like what is being spoken about is the important thing I need to hear right now.”  

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